Volunteer face painter Stacy Sparks applies the finishing touch of a ladybug on 19-month-old Maxine Lawson-Mangum. The little girl was one of dozens who stopped at the face-painting booth Saturday at the Fishermen’s Fall Festival at Fishermen’s Terminal in Magnolia. The festival featured many kid-friendly booths, music, seafood and J.P. Patches himself. All proceeds went to the Fishermen’s Memorial Fund.
Volunteer face painter Stacy Sparks applies the finishing touch of a ladybug on 19-month-old Maxine Lawson-Mangum. The little girl was one of dozens who stopped at the face-painting booth Saturday at the Fishermen’s Fall Festival at Fishermen’s Terminal in Magnolia. The festival featured many kid-friendly booths, music, seafood and J.P. Patches himself. All proceeds went to the Fishermen’s Memorial Fund.
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Sunshine graced the Fishermen's Fall Festival this Saturday, adding to existing family friendly warmth.
The festival was organized by merchants at the Fishermen's Terminal and operated largely by volunteers in orange T-shirts.
Most of the activities were focused on children such as face painting, shell painting, wooden-boat making and fishing for trout. Joanne Di Bernardo of San Diego escorted her granddaughter, Nina Thompson of West Seattle who was busy brushing pink paint onto an oyster shell.
"I think this is great," Di Bernardo said, while behind her, the distant drumming from traditional taiko band, Inochi Taiko, filled the air. "I'm very impressed with the memorial."
Visitors watched the Inochi Taiko as they sat and ate barbecued salmon cooked on a woodfire pit. Nearby, the staff at Alaska Weathervane Seafood was grilling bacon-wrapped scallops, a new feature at the festival.
Iconic clown J.P. Patches regaled the crowd with a round of Simon Says. Proceeds from the festival went to the Fishermen's Memorial Fund.