File photo: The city is temporarily closing its major regional parks this weekend. Closures begin at 11 p.m. Friday, April 10 and reopen at 4:30 a.m. Monday, April 12.
File photo: The city is temporarily closing its major regional parks this weekend. Closures begin at 11 p.m. Friday, April 10 and reopen at 4:30 a.m. Monday, April 12.

Because of continued gatherings in major parks and crowded public places, the City of Seattle announced the full closure of major regional parks this weekend where social-distancing guidelines have not been followed by patrons.

The parks that will be temporarily closed are Seattle Parks and Recreation’s eight destination parks: Green Lake, Lincoln, Golden Gardens, Seward Park, Magnuson Park, Gas Works, Alki Beach and Discovery, as well as Cal Anderson, Carkeek, Woodland Park, Volunteer Park, Kubota Garden, West Seattle Stadium and the Washington Park Arboretum. They will close at 11 p.m. on Friday, April 10 and reopen at 4:30 a.m. Monday, April 12. Stan Sayres, Magnuson, Don Armeni and Atlantic Street boat launches are also closed. Trails at Lake Washington Boulevard will remain open, but group gatherings will be prohibited. Rattlesnake Lake Recreation Area and Rattlesnake Ledge Trail will remain closed. 

For the time being, neighborhood parks will remain open, but the city will consider closing them or making temporary closures longer if visitors don't follow safety guidelines according to a city press release.

The city intends to implement a park-by-park plan to ensure residents can safely use larger regional parks when they reopen, according to a city press release.

 
“These are the beautiful weather days we crave all winter, but we are living in unprecedented times and the governor’s order isn’t stay out — it's stay home,” Mayor Jenny Durkan said in a press release. “Seattle’s frontline medical workers,  vulnerable residents and displaced workers need you to stay home. While Seattle is expecting near perfect weather, friends and families should not have family or friend outings, picnics or gatherings in parks. Stay home unless you need to go to an essential job or business. If you need to take a walk in your neighborhood, be smart and don’t help create a crowded place. Too many friends, residents and families are continuing to gather for picnics, barbecues, basketball games and group walks. Because we still are in danger of a spike in infections, hospitalizations and deaths, we have to keep doing out part. Easing up on social distancing too early will put more people at risk, could overwhelm our health care system, and could delay the reopening of businesses. Stay home, and if you must leave your home, be smart, follow social-distancing guidelines by staying at least six feet from everyone and wear a mask. Our collective effort has made an impact flattening the curve, but we must continue or face even greater and longer term consequences.”