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Magnolia’s WinterFest was a lot more than just shopping in the neighborhood while visiting with family and friends. It was also a great opportunity for residents to support the Moyer Foundation and the Ballard Food Bank.

The Moyer Foundation, an organization that aims to help children in distress, will benefit a lot from the donations made by participating stores and their customers. The stores supporting the Moyer Foundation donated a portion of their sales to the foundation that will use the money to reach more troubled children.

“We are beyond thankful for the support. None of this would be possible without local Seattle community support,” said Kayla Tiscornia, partner regulations manager at the Moyer Foundation. 

The Ballard Food Bank, which also serves the Magnolia and Queen Anne areas, has a mission to bring food and hope to their neighbors and they are also thankful for Magnolia’s assistance and support. The Ballard Food Bank had bins located at multiple stores where food could be donated as well as jars for money donations. 

“For every $1 raised by the food bank, we are able to deliver $3 worth of food,” said David O’Neal, president of the board for the Ballard Food Bank.

Many of the participating stores offered a special deal for those who made a donation to one of the organizations. Cocoa & Cream offered a free scoop of ice cream for anyone that made a $5 donation to the Moyer Foundation. The Wheeler Street Kitchen, which opened specifically for WinterFest, offered a discount on customers’ orders if they made a donation to the Ballard Food Bank or the Moyer Foundation. And PJ’s Paws & Claws offered extra Wags for shopping that night and 50 wags to those who donated to the Ballard Food Bank.

“This is our first WinterFest and we are hoping to make it an annual thing,” Patti Howell, the top cat at PJ’s Paws & Claws, said. “We hope to keep the momentum going, and hope to help keep the village alive.”

Carrie Campbell, co-owner of the Wheeler Street kitchen, was also excited to be part of this year’s WinterFest.

“This is a nice community event and we are glad to take part in it,” she said.

Many of the participating stores featured artwork done by children attending local schools. It was like a scavenger hunt for the families to find their child’s art. Some of the kids even helped give out some of the gingerbread hot chocolate and truffle samples at Cocoa & Cream.

Over at Magnolia’s Bookstore, muralist and Magnolia resident Linda Sommerville displayed some of her work, which depicted some beautifully eccentric breeds of chickens.  Sommerville used to paint large murals for business, including the Luigi’s restaurant sign in the Magnolia Village. But as she has gotten older, she decided she had had enough of working scaffolding. Now, she creates with acrylics, watercolors and oils. Anyone interested in seeing her studio can visit her website, www.paintingsbysommerville.com

The village was lit up with Christmas lights and the holiday music could be heard on the streets every time a store’s front door was opened. Families were milling about, looking at the goodies each store had. Everyone was bundled up in their warm coats braving the cold weather to support their community and have a nice time with friends and family.

The Magnolia Village Pub had live music and a lively atmosphere for those looking to warm up with a drink or two and listen to some great tunes as they did so.