Photo courtesy SDOT: The Magnolia 33rd Avenue West Pedestrian and Bicycle Bridge connects pedestrians and bikers across an active railroad corridor to Commodore Park and the Ballard Locks area. SDOT is hosting a virtual meeting about the bridge’s future on Sept. 23.
Photo courtesy SDOT: The Magnolia 33rd Avenue West Pedestrian and Bicycle Bridge connects pedestrians and bikers across an active railroad corridor to Commodore Park and the Ballard Locks area. SDOT is hosting a virtual meeting about the bridge’s future on Sept. 23.
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Residents are invited to attend a virtual informational meeting about the future of the 33rd Avenue West pedestrian and bicycle bridge in Magnolia.

The meeting, which will be hosted by the Seattle Department of Transportation, will take place from 11:30 to 1:30 p.m. Sept. 23 via WebEx.

During that time, people will have the opportunity to learn about the project, get questions answered, provide feedback and speak with project staff.

Christa Dumpys, communications and outreach lead for the project said, SDOT is considering whether to rehabilitate or replace the bridge, which is showing its age but is still safe to use. Dumpys said SDOT has no plans to remove the structure and not replace it.

“We know that this is a really important connection for pedestrians and people to bike in the neighborhood and the area,” she said.

According to the project overview, the timber bridge is situated near the Salmon Bay waterfront. The bridge links pedestrians and bikers across an active railroad corridor to Commodore Park and the Ballard Locks area and the Burke-Gilman Trail.

Project Manager Mike Ward said SDOT only has funding through 90 percent of the project through the Move Seattle levy, which does not include final design or construction.

“But we like to have plans in place so when that funding becomes available, we are ready to go,” he said.

At this stage, project staff will be considering different options for how to replace or repair the bridge.

 “There are cost implications associated with all the options,” Ward said.

According to the project website, in this phase, “evaluations are based on considerations like demand for walking and biking, short- and long-term residential impacts, bridge maintenance, cost and environmental impacts. environmental impacts.”

Dumpys said, because connection to the Ballard Locks is closed, the usage of the bridge may be a bit different, which is why project staff will consider what the average usage is.

Dumpy’s said the upcoming meeting and the other public outreach opportunities SDOT is conducting is important for the project.

“This will be an opportunity for for folks to give feedback,” Dumpys said. “We want understand how the bridge is utilized and why it is important.”

She said the early design phase of the project, which offers residents the best opportunity to share what they want done and have their input considered.

“Definitely, now is the time for folks to be keyed in and give their input,” Dumpys said.

After the public input stage, which will conclude in November, plans for the different alternatives will be finalized.

Ward said, if the project stays on schedule, the planning phase should conclude in mid-2021. At that time, staff will consider what funding options are available to complete the design work and plan for construction. If everything goes well, the final design could be completed by the middle or late fall of next year, with construction set to begin in early 2022.

“This is all dependent on maintaining the schedule and whether we feel good about the funding sources,” Ward said.

For more information, or to sign up for updates on the project, people should visit the website.

To attend the virtual meeting Sept. 23, go to https://seattle.webex.com/seattle/j.php?MTID=m07c036722eb0f0e8c0313a67ca9fc445.