Photo courtesy David Wesley: Bayview resident David Wesley’s electric-assist four-wheel custom cycle, which he calls a quadracycle, was stolen at 8:30 a.m. June 4 from the Bayview visistor parking garage.
Photo courtesy David Wesley: Bayview resident David Wesley’s electric-assist four-wheel custom cycle, which he calls a quadracycle, was stolen at 8:30 a.m. June 4 from the Bayview visistor parking garage.

A Queen Anne man is hoping the community will help him get an important possession back after it was stolen.

Bayview resident David Wesley had a custom-made electric-assist four-wheel cycle stolen at 8:30 a.m. June 4 from the Bayview visitor parking garage.

“It’s like I lost a member of my family and my future,” Wesley said. “I’m surprised it hit me so hard.”

Wesley said other Bayview residents thought they saw the person captured on film stealing the vehicle in the neighborhood again scoping out cars and followed him to the nearby Metropolitan Market, where they saw him drop off a blue two-wheeled bicycle he was riding with some street people and pick up a jacket from them before they lost sight of him.

Wesley is offering a reward of $200 for the return of the vehicle, no questions asked.

While the machine, which he calls a “quadracycle” is valuable, its value to him is even greater.

First, the bike is a production prototype — a display model of what he was hoping to put into production, according to an email.

The quadracycle features a recumbent seat and fat tires, a mid-drive motor so he can climb hills, front disk brakes for safety, a canopy and a wind screen. It is designed for safety and convenience. Wesley said he has never been comfortable riding a two-wheeled bicycle, nor would he risk taking a trike in Seattle or go down a hill with wet streets.

It is a better version of one he built with his own hands seven years ago. Three years ago, Wesley hired a builder in Illinois to create this machine for him.

“I have been continually working on it to get it to the point where I feel it is ready for market,” he said in an email. “I am not able, at this time, to produce, acquire or build another at this time.

“With the production model gone, I cannot pursue my dreams of making it available to others that would benefit from it,” he added.

Wesley said he also depends on the bike because it gives him his freedom to travel through the city.

“I get to go everywhere and know that I can get back, so I can keep expanding my travels,” Wesley said.

Wesley said he has chronic heart failure and diabetes — things that would otherwise keep him from exercising or getting out, “but I go all over town. I don’t need anybody to take me anywhere.”

While he still has the original machine he built, the second machine was used by his wife, Marilyn, so they could ride together. Together they have ridden their bikes on the bike path on Westlake Avenue and along the canal. He also used it for all the shopping, riding almost three times every day to get groceries, mail and hardware for their houseboat.

When Wesley and his wife moved to Bayview last August, his wife’s bike did not have enough power to return up the hill to Bayview, nor to return from the waterfront across the pedestrian bridge on Third Avenue. Two months ago, Wesley installed a motor that was strong enough to accommodate the hills, and they have had a few rides they enjoyed very much, he said.

“I was hoping to introduce her to more of the excellent biking here in Seattle,” Wesley said in an email. “I want to be with her as she bikes until she is comfortable with the area she’s biking in. Without the production bike, we cannot ride together. Her riding has stopped.”

As of Monday, Wesley is still hoping his stolen quadracycle will be returned and his trips around Seattle will resume. He said the freedom of getting out and exploring Seattle without having to worry about parking, weather, congested streets, hills, tipping over or sliding on wet streets as he turns corners, is addicting.

People with information about the quadracycle are asked to contact Wesley at 206-718-4774 or david_wesley@ymail.com.