QAMAG News file photo: 'Magnolia Midcentury Memories,’ the Magnolia Historical Society’s third book in a series highlighting the neighborhood’s history through the decades, was recognized by the Association of King County Historical Organizations with the Long Term Project Award.
QAMAG News file photo: 'Magnolia Midcentury Memories,’ the Magnolia Historical Society’s third book in a series highlighting the neighborhood’s history through the decades, was recognized by the Association of King County Historical Organizations with the Long Term Project Award.

The Association of King County Historical Organizations last week awarded the Magnolia Historical Society with the Long Term Project Award for “Magnolia: Midcentury Memories” at its annual awards program.

Each year the AKCHO acknowledges people, programs or projects that have highlighted the county’s history at its awards program. According to the AKCHO’s award letter, the Long Term Project Award is presented to an organization “for an innovative and impactful multi-year project” designed to “have a sustained, long-term impact on the heritage of King County.”

“Magnolia: Midcentury Memories,” a large coffee table-style that was published last year, is the Magnolia Historical Society’s third book in a series highlighting the neighborhood’s history through the decades.

More than 60 writers contributed to the book, which took two and a half years to finish. “Magnolia: Midcentury Memories” highlights the history of Magnolia in the 1950s-’60s and includes major events from those two decades as they were reflected in the neighborhood through essays and first-person memoirs and 450 archival photos.

The Magnolia Historical Society’s book series, edited by project organizer Monica Wooton, began with “Magnolia Memories and Milestones” and was followed by “Magnolia Making More Memories” before concluding with last year’s book. The series was made possible through an $80,000 Department of Neighbhorhoods Match Grant and over 1,700 volunteer hours.

At the virtual AKCHO annual awards ceremony last week, Wooton said “Magnolia: Midcentury Memories” and the other two books demonstrated that residents in any neighborhood could complete a collaborative, accurate historical writing project.

“The Magnolia books — with every iteration — had more and more community members step up to help,” Wooton said in the award presentation. “Volunteer writers increased two fold with every book. Local fundraising doubled each time. Community pride built exponentially with each publication, as did knowledge of who we are as Magnolians, where we came from to build this neighborhood and how we did it.”