Mr. Gable
Mr. Gable

Set out to write about Academy Award upsets and right away the ground starts shifting under your feet. Oh, some neck-snappers we all remember—like Jack Nicholson coming out to present the award for best picture of 2005, opening the envelope, and saying, "Whoa." Moments when the title of the movie everybody figured to win suddenly wasn't the one being read aloud.

But those are ya-hadda-be-there moments. Looking back over Oscar history, you encounter what we might call upsets-in-reverse—instances when a movie or a performance that has long since become part of the racial unconscious did not, in its day, win proper recognition. Then you find yourself in a sort of "What did they know and when did they know it?" situation. How could they have been so blind? We've collected some of that kind of upset as well.

Upsets come in all valences, triumphant and appalling. Truly the ways of Oscar passeth understanding. But that needn't spoil the party.

1939
It was Hollywood's golden year. Stagecoach ... Mr. Smith Goes to Washington ... Ninotchka ... The Wizard of Oz ... Only Angels Have Wings ... Young Mr. Lincoln ... Wuthering Heights ... Of Mice and Men ... Gunga Din ... Midnight ... Drums Along the Mohawk ... Love Affair ... The Four Feathers (OK, made in England, but still). Yet it was the making of one movie that obsessed fans all year long, and when it ended up with a then-record 13 Oscar nominations, no one doubted that David O. Selznick's nearly-four-hour Technicolor megaproduction Gone With the Wind would take the brass ring. A lot of brass rings, including best director for Victor Fleming despite the fact that some half-dozen directors (preeminently George Cukor and Sam Wood) had worked on the film. Most of the major players were nominated (including Thomas Mitchell, albeit for Stagecoach, not GWTW); newcomer-to-Hollywood Vivien Leigh won best actress as Scarlett O'Hara, and Hattie McDaniel edged fellow cast member Olivia De Havilland for best supporting actress. Yet what was wrong with this picture? Although novelist Margaret Mitchell had written the book visualizing Clark Gable as Rhett Butler, Gable had to settle for a nomination merely (best actor went to Robert Donat for Goodbye, Mr. Chips; we'd have given it to Frank Capra's Mr. Smith, Jimmy Stewart). The King took it like a man, of course. But watch GWTW today and try telling us all that Selznickean flapdoodle would be tolerable without Gable's movie-star gravitas to center it.


A dozen more years' worth at http://movies.msn.com/academy-awards/oscar-upsets/