<em>The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo</em>: Rooney Mara as Lisbeth Salander
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo: Rooney Mara as Lisbeth Salander
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Yes, we're past the point when anything more needs to be said about the 84th Oscars, and yet I've seen no mention of the most wackily wonderful moment of the evening. It afforded a look inside Academy ritual, and an instance of late-blooming justice being done against considerable odds. So please indulge one last Oscar commentary.

It was around mid-show and the category about to be announced was Best Editing. Four of the five films in contention were Best Picture nominees, which is typical, and understandable: surely a picture's putative Best-ness has a lot to do with the excellence of its various elements? So Editing would just be part of the politics, the gamesmanship, the emotional rollercoaster of the night. Hugo had taken the lead with two wins right out of the gate, Cinematography and Art Direction—would Editing further hint at an upset of frontrunner The Artist, with Martin Scorsese's editorial right arm Thelma Schoonmaker adding a fourth Academy statuette to her mantel (she's won for Raging Bull, 1980; The Aviator, 2004; and The Departed, 2006)? The other Best Pic contenders whose editors had been nominated were Moneyball (those wonderful boardroom schmoozes! Brad Pitt working the phones!) and The Descendants (uh, OK). The fifth slot had gone to The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, a much-ballyhooed Christmastime release that hadn't exactly flopped, but neither had it inspired brushfire enthusiasm among critics or ticket-buyers. An "It's an honor just to be nominated" entry if ever we saw one. Your seats are way in the back, guys.

Then The Girl won. And as co-editors Kirk Baxter and Angus Wall were making their way down the aisle, you could read the mutual WTF body language and expressions plain as day. When they got to the podium they made it explicit: we weren't expecting this, we have prepared nothing to say, but thank you David and, er, yeah. Exit, pursued by a chuckle.

"David" was director David Fincher. At last year's Oscar ceremony Baxter and Wall had collected the selfsame award for editing his The Social Network. Back-to-back wins are rare. That, even more than The Girl's overall also-ran status among 2011 films, was why they weren't expecting to be called to the stage again on this particular night.

But they belonged there, because their editing has a lot to do with why Fincher's movie is going to find more and more favor over the years. People will stop worrying that there was a 2009 Swedish film rendering of the Stieg Larsson bestseller because, with the exceptions of leading actors Michael Nyqvist and Noomi Rapace, it doesn't hold a candle to the American version. Fincher's movie runs only a quarter-hour longer than its predecessor but encompasses much more of the material, atmosphere, and teeming gallery of characters (including the Vanger dead) in Larsson's 600-page tome. Steven Zaillian did the adaptation, a heroic task, but it's Fincher's visual and aural detailing and the at-times-subliminal editing by Baxter and Wall that set it before us and make it play, laminate past and present with breathtaking translucency.

So guys, what are you cutting in 2012? —RTJ