Daniel Radcliffe: where's a good wand when you need one?
Daniel Radcliffe: where's a good wand when you need one?


Kathleen Murphy writes:

The Woman in Black has scared the bejayzus out of audiences since first materializing in Susan Hill's 1983 faux-gothic novel. Subsequently, this Victorian ghost story's been adapted for British radio and television, and even for the stage. (The play opened in 1989 and is still selling tickets—the second-longest run in London history.) Now this durable haunt pops up in a mainstream scary movie, notable for being the first Hammer Productions release in 35 years and Daniel Radcliffe's first post-Potter showcase.
      Sadly, despite the dogged conjurings of helmer James Watkins (Eden Lake) and screenwriter Jane Goldman (Kick-Ass), this iteration of The Woman in Black is a slog through a dismal slough, jolted every 10 minutes or so by jack-in-the-box scares accompanied by loud, annoying blasts of sound. One or two moments of genuinely unsettling horror fail to keep this 95-minute ghost story alive and moving.

Slog on at http://movies.msn.com/movies/movie-critic-reviews/the-woman-in-black.3/