Jordan Cohen passed away peacefully Sunday morning, March 26, 2017, at Swedish Hospital Ballard. He was 93 years young and always full of optimism, laughter, and energy.
Jordan was born on the Bremerton to Seattle ferry, on Memorial Day, 1923. For 40 years, he and his beloved wife, Lillian, commuted to their business in Port Orchard, WA via ferry. Jordan was a pillar of the local Port Orchard community until his retirement in 1993. During this time, he started the revitalization of historic downtown Port Orchard, as well as The Days of 1949 and the Children’s Parade to restore the Pioneer legacy of the town.
Upon retirement, Jordan began a second career pursuing his passion for entertaining and bringing joy to others. He proudly volunteered at Seattle Children’s Hospital for over 30 years, where he brought smiles to the children and families with his weekly visits. He also was a part-time actor with roles in “Tony and Tina’s Wedding,” “Anything Goes,” “Frasier,” “Scratch Merchants,” and a national commercial for Foot Locker.
As a trained laughing coach who taught classes, a motivational speaker or in his favorite role of befriending a stranger who looked like they could use a smile or laugh, Jordan lived life to its fullest. He was known for his antics of getting everyone to laugh or sing “Happy Birthday” to someone at Costco or even on the street.
He self-published four books: “Making Your Day Makes Mine,” “Molly,” “Don’t Belly Ache, Belly Laugh,” and “Love Letters to Lillian.” He also wrote several articles and poems.
Jordan was the youngest of four boys raised by his mother who was widowed when Jordan was six months old. He lost his beloved brother, Maurice, in World War II and kept his memory alive with mementos and articles. Jordan served in WW II as a corporal in General Patton’s 748th tank battalion. As well as his tank duties during the war, he was the editor of the Lion’s Roar newspaper and performed with the comedy group Dehydrated Corn.
Jordan is survived by Lillian, his beloved wife of 65 years, his five children, 12 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. His family was his greatest wealth.
In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to the  Jordan Cohen Fund at Seattle Children’s Hospital.