Inventory manager Ashleigh Rhinehart (left) and general manager Carly Houghton stand outside Queen Anne Cannabis Company on April 20, during the store's grand opening. Previously called GreenAnne, the business had been a medicinal marijuana dispensary. Photo by Joe Veyera
Inventory manager Ashleigh Rhinehart (left) and general manager Carly Houghton stand outside Queen Anne Cannabis Company on April 20, during the store's grand opening. Previously called GreenAnne, the business had been a medicinal marijuana dispensary. Photo by Joe Veyera

April 20 is well known as a counterculture “holiday” for marijuana enthusiasts.

 So, it’s only fair that that day also served as the grand opening date for a new recreational pot shop in Queen Anne.

Formerly GreenAnne, the storefront for Queen Anne Cannabis Company at 312 W. Republican St. had previously been a medicinal marijuana outlet.

Now, the store — which had originally opened in 2012 in its previous iteration — is entirely recreational, billing itself as a 21-and-over “premier marijuana boutique.”

General manager Carly Houghton said the transition was the logical next step to keep the business going.

“I feel like that’s how things go,” said inventory manager Ashleigh Rhinehart of the transition from medicinal to recreational. “It’s just step-by-step, and we’re all learning together.”

Houghton said while there have been a few complaints about the change from medicinal buyers, those are concerns statewide in regards to current laws. Locally, she said, the neighborhood has been supportive.

“There haven’t been any critiques from the community around here at all,” Houghton said. “They’ve been super supportive, and we’re super thankful for that, and without them we wouldn’t even be here.”

Rhinehart also had praise for the neighborhood, and said she hopes that customers really become a community within a community. 

“Queen Anne is a great location,” Rhinehart said. “It’s in the middle of the city, but it’s also a sweet community, a kind of tightknit location.”

Meanwhile, Houghton said she hopes that the store and its customers are able to push back against some of the stereotypical thinking in regards to marijuana smokers.

“We want to be a part of a movement that nobody else is a part of it,” she said. “We want to give a new meaning to the word ‘stoner’ because it’s so looked down upon, and it’s horrible to say and be called that, but now we’re shining a whole new light on stuff, and I think that we just want to keep moving with that momentum and move with the industry and keep up on everything as best we can, and keep people happy.”

Anyone wishing to enter the store must have their I.D. present with them.

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